Common or multiple futures for end of life care around the world? Ideas from the ‘waiting room of history’

Published on: Author: Dr Shahaduz Zaman 1 Comment
Dr Shahaduz Zaman, University of Glasgow

Around the world there is a growing interest in the ways in which dying people are cared for, but there is little or no agreement on what ‘good death’ really means. With such fundamentals left unresolved, should we address the global challenge of end of life care around the world in a unified way, or… Continue reading

Glasgow End of Life Studies Group members reveal their highlights of 2016

Published on: Author: guwebteam 2 Comments

What were your milestones, highlights, top tips and even low points in 2016? Our bloggers start the conversation with their notable moments from the year: David Clark It has been a terrific time for the project. In March I was able to lay out the scope of our ambitions at the Palliative Care Congress in Glasgow. During… Continue reading

Christmas 1965, Cicely Saunders writes to American sociologist Anselm Strauss

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment
Cicely Saunders

As Christmas approached in December 1965, Cicely Saunders could look back on a year of considerable achievement. After seven years, she had decided to leave St Joseph’s Hospice in Hackney, where she had learned in-depth the craft of caring for dying patients. She was now devoting the whole of her time to the planning of… Continue reading

To Comfort Always: lessons from the past to inform the future at Hospice UK 2016

Published on: Author: David Clark 1 Comment
David Clark at Hospice UK conference (image copyright Jonathan Goldberg jongoldberg.co.uk)

I have had close links with Hospice UK for many years, serving first as a Trustee and now as a Vice-President. So it was a real honour to be invited to give the opening plenary at the charity’s annual conference in Liverpool, in a splendid riverside setting overlooking the Mersey.  The timing was good too. … Continue reading

Being human in the face of ‘personalisation’, and what that means when we come to the end of our lives

Published on: Author: Jacqueline Kandsberger Leave a comment
Jackie Kandsberger on the University of Glasgow Dumfries Campus

All over the USA people are crying out that we have lost the ability to communicate with our fellow man, that words no longer even have the same meaning to each of us in our polarised society. Brexit, Trump … slowly the eyes of the world are turning to the next western elections: France, then Germany. When… Continue reading

Assisted suicide as a remedy for suffering? The end-of-life preferences of British “suicide tourists”

Published on: Author: Dr Naomi Richards Leave a comment

Individuals’ aesthetic preferences for a good death are as significant as physical suffering in decisions to opt for an assisted suicide. This is the main finding from my anthropological study, now available as an open access article Assisted Suicide as a Remedy for Suffering? The End-of-Life Preferences of British “Suicide Tourists” in the journal Medical Anthropology.… Continue reading

To Comfort Always: a history of palliative medicine since the nineteenth century

Published on: Author: David Clark 1 Comment

I have been interested in the history of palliative care for over 20 years.  I first got going on this work with Neil Small by conducting interviews with hospice founders in the United Kingdom and we then collaborated with Michelle Winslow and Nic Hughes on a general interest book about hospice pioneers. Later I worked… Continue reading