An invitation to an end of life community event in Dumfries, Scotland

Published on: Author: Marian Krawczyk Leave a comment
Marian Krawczyk and Margaret Dobie

This invitation stems from meeting Margaret Dobie, who I first got to know last fall, shortly after I arrived in Dumfries to join the Glasgow End of Life Studies Group. Margaret has attended many of the Group’s community events in Dumfries and Galloway over the last two years, and when I wrote my first post… Continue reading

Can palliative care improve society? Cicely Saunders and the moral order of dying

Published on: Author: David Clark 1 Comment

In 1961 Cicely Saunders, in a short article written for a general audience, observed:  ‘A society which shuns the dying must have an incomplete philosophy’ [1]. The remark is loaded with import. In her observation, ‘the dying’, seem to constitute a known social category. Not only neglected, they are persistently avoided, ignored, or rejected through… Continue reading

A new world map of palliative care development

Published on: Author: Nicole Baur Leave a comment

  For those who seek to advocate for the development of palliative care as an aspect of Universal Health Coverage, having access to good global data is important. There is much interest in trying to understand how and to what extent palliative care is developing in each of the countries of the world. The World… Continue reading

A moment for compassion

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment

In recent times I have been struck by the widespread use of the term ‘compassion’. It is being colonized by many groups, organisations  and discourses – sometimes with rather opposing purposes. Widely used by the supporters of palliative care, it has also been adopted by those that promote assisted dying. It is found in the… Continue reading

Observations from a first Reading and Writing Death workshop

Published on: Author: Amy Shea Leave a comment
notebooks and a copy of the article 'grief and the headhunter's rage'

Our first few Reading and Writing Death workshops have been a great success. They have challenged us to consider how memoirs from the dying can be such valuable resources for the living; how experimental essays can be used to dig into such a difficult topic; and we’ve discussed memory, experience, and empathy via anthropological texts on… Continue reading

Invitation to a summer postgraduate workshop on witnessing at the end of life

Published on: Author: Solveiga Zibaite Leave a comment
Solveiga Zibaite

I’m delighted to announce that we are hosting a free postgraduate student workshop on Witnessing at the End of Life, which will take place on the 11th and 12th of June 2018. This two day workshop is designed for postgraduate students by postgraduate students. My fellow PhD student Jacqueline Kandsberger and I are organising the event… Continue reading

Celebrating the centenary of Cicely Saunders

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment
Dame Cicely Saunders (courtesy of Christopher Saunders’)

In 2018 we are celebrating the centenary of the birth of Cicely Saunders. She is the acknowledged founder of the modern hospice movement which led to the creation of the palliative care specialty. So we can expect to see a wide range of events and activities to mark the occasion, not only in her own country, but… Continue reading

Intergenerational housing with care

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment
Professor David Clark

There’s a buzz around about ‘mixing’ across the generations, bringing benefits to young and old alike. The Channel Four series about the St Monica Trust ‘Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds’ showed the exciting things that happen when children and older residents spend sustained time together, and also made for great viewing. Hospices like… Continue reading