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A Collaboration between Artists and Academics to Exhibit Powerful Drawings Showing the Last Days of Life

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards 1 Comment

By Dr Naomi Richards and Dr Marian Krawczyk In November 2018 we exhibited a series of drawings by a renowned Scottish artist showing powerful glimpses of death and dying. The exhibition was shown at the Yellow Door Gallery in Dumfries as part of the UK wide Being Human festival of the Arts & Humanities, and… Continue reading

In touch with the dead

Published on: Author: Marian Krawczyk Leave a comment

One of the most fundamental ways we show love and connection is through touch. This behaviour is so central to our understanding of what it means to be in relationship with another person that visual representations of touch have become one of the most common visual forms of ‘shorthand’ to indicate compassionate caring, including at… Continue reading

An invitation to an end of life community event in Dumfries, Scotland

Published on: Author: Marian Krawczyk Leave a comment
Marian Krawczyk and Margaret Dobie

This invitation stems from meeting Margaret Dobie, who I first got to know last fall, shortly after I arrived in Dumfries to join the Glasgow End of Life Studies Group. Margaret has attended many of the Group’s community events in Dumfries and Galloway over the last two years, and when I wrote my first post… Continue reading

Dr Marian Krawczyk on her new research role at the University of Glasgow

Published on: Author: Marian Krawczyk Leave a comment
Dr Marian Krawczyk

I have always been fascinated by hospitals. They are spaces where some of the most intense and vulnerable moments of our lives happen, and for many of us, it is also be where we will spend our very last days of life and die. Given the importance of the hospital in our final illness trajectories,… Continue reading

Understanding hospital palliative care as an affective economy

If, like me, you are a citizen of the global North, the statistical probability is that you–after a protracted illness–will spend your last days and die in an acute-care hospital. Increasingly, a good death in these institutions calls for a specific form of medical expertise–palliative care. As a medical anthropologist, one of my main research… Continue reading