Assisted dying, suffering and dying as a work of art

Published on: Author: Gitte Koksvik 2 Comments

As an anthropologist, I am interested in assisted dying as a cultural practice and in the discourse surrounding it. What does it tell us about our culture and about its values? In line with historian Shai Lavi, I too contend that the most interesting ethical question pertaining to assisted dying is not “what should we do” but… Continue reading

Suffering and Autonomy at the End of Life – University of Glasgow Conference April 2018

Published on: Author: josephwood2 1 Comment

Cicely Saunders once stated that ‘suffering is only intolerable when nobody cares’. Yet suffering is a broad concept with many aspects. Members from the Glasgow End of Life Studies Group recently attended a two-day philosophy conference entitled ‘Suffering and Autonomy at the End of Life’. Speakers came from a range of academic disciplines – including… Continue reading

New PhD scholarship on ‘total pain’ in palliative care – apply now

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards Leave a comment

A new fully-funded PhD scholarship on the philosophical underpinnings of palliative care is now open for applications. The deadline for applications is 13th May 2018. The PhD candidate will join the Glasgow End of Life Studies group, which works to develop and promote interdisciplinary approaches to end of life issues. This PhD will provide a… Continue reading

College students engage in death talk over a cuppa

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards Leave a comment
Brian Hall and Solveiga Zibaite

Young people are not the usual attendees at Death Cafés. Perhaps this is because their youth makes death seem a remote prospect. Or because they are too busy trying to get a foothold in our precarious, zero-hours contract economy to spend too much time contemplating the hereafter. Instead of pondering young people’s absence at such… Continue reading

‘Passive euthanasia’ is legal in India: what difference does it make?

Published on: Author: Hamilton Inbadas Leave a comment

On 9 March 2018, in a landmark verdict, the Supreme Court of India ruled that “‘passive euthanasia’ is lawful and legally permissible in this country”. What is the significance of this judgement, what are its implications for end of life care in India and what will the general public understand about this constitutional development? The key… Continue reading