Observations from a first Reading and Writing Death workshop

Published on: Author: Amy Shea 3 Comments
notebooks and a copy of the article 'grief and the headhunter's rage'

Our first few Reading and Writing Death workshops have been a great success. They have challenged us to consider how memoirs from the dying can be such valuable resources for the living; how experimental essays can be used to dig into such a difficult topic; and we’ve discussed memory, experience, and empathy via anthropological texts on… Continue reading

Invitation to a summer postgraduate workshop on witnessing at the end of life

Published on: Author: Solveiga Zibaite 2 Comments
Solveiga Zibaite

I’m delighted to announce that we are hosting a free postgraduate student workshop on Witnessing at the End of Life, which will take place on the 11th and 12th of June 2018. This two day workshop is designed for postgraduate students by postgraduate students. My fellow PhD student Jacqueline Kandsberger and I are organising the event… Continue reading

Celebrating the centenary of Cicely Saunders

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment
Dame Cicely Saunders (courtesy of Christopher Saunders’)

In 2018 we are celebrating the centenary of the birth of Cicely Saunders. She is the acknowledged founder of the modern hospice movement which led to the creation of the palliative care specialty. So we can expect to see a wide range of events and activities to mark the occasion, not only in her own country, but… Continue reading

Intergenerational housing with care

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment
Professor David Clark

There’s a buzz around about ‘mixing’ across the generations, bringing benefits to young and old alike. The Channel Four series about the St Monica Trust ‘Old People’s Home for Four Year Olds’ showed the exciting things that happen when children and older residents spend sustained time together, and also made for great viewing. Hospices like… Continue reading

Pain relief and palliative care around the world – new ideas from a Lancet Commission

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment

We have very few global landmarks in the evolution of palliative care. So when a new one comes along it is important to take note, to reflect, and to consider the implications. The report of the Lancet Commission on Pain and Palliative Care is such a work. I was fortunate to be asked to join… Continue reading

It’s good to talk, but watch your euphemisms: discussing death and dying with children and young adults

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards Leave a comment
statue of Jean Armour in Dumfries, Scotland

I drive past a statue of Jean Armour, the wife of the Scottish poet Robert Burns, every morning on the way to work. When my 4 year old daughter, travelling with me, asked me about the statue, I told her it was to celebrate the life of someone who had died; that the woman must… Continue reading

Merryn Gott presents her participatory research into community palliative care

Published on: Author: guwebteam Leave a comment
Professor Merryn Gott

I met David more years ago than probably either of us care to remember, when I was appointed to my first research post at the University of Sheffield. We have both moved since then – I’m now in New Zealand and David obviously in Dumfries – so it was great to be invited to visit… Continue reading

Dr Marian Krawczyk on her new research role at the University of Glasgow

Published on: Author: Marian Krawczyk Leave a comment
Dr Marian Krawczyk

I have always been fascinated by hospitals. They are spaces where some of the most intense and vulnerable moments of our lives happen, and for many of us, it is also be where we will spend our very last days of life and die. Given the importance of the hospital in our final illness trajectories,… Continue reading