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Suffering and Autonomy at the End of Life – University of Glasgow Conference April 2018

Published on: Author: josephwood2 1 Comment

Cicely Saunders once stated that ‘suffering is only intolerable when nobody cares’. Yet suffering is a broad concept with many aspects. Members from the Glasgow End of Life Studies Group recently attended a two-day philosophy conference entitled ‘Suffering and Autonomy at the End of Life’. Speakers came from a range of academic disciplines – including… Continue reading

A moment for compassion

Published on: Author: David Clark Leave a comment

In recent times I have been struck by the widespread use of the term ‘compassion’. It is being colonized by many groups, organisations  and discourses – sometimes with rather opposing purposes. Widely used by the supporters of palliative care, it has also been adopted by those that promote assisted dying. It is found in the… Continue reading

End of life issues in hospitals: Comparing Scotland, Denmark and New Zealand

Published on: Author: guwebteam Leave a comment
(left to right) Lene Jarlbaek, Merryn Gott, David Clark, Richard Meade

This is a chance to enjoy recordings of three leading academics presenting their research into end of life in hospitals in Scotland, Denmark and New Zealand and hear them comparing the differences between the three countries in a lively public discussion. We’d love you to join in the discussion, so please leave your comments or… Continue reading

Cicely Saunders’ book Beyond the Horizon translated into German

Published on: Author: David Clark 1 Comment
Martina Holder Franz

Published in German 10 years after the death of Cicely Saunders, Der Horizont ist nur die Grenze unserer Sicht  is a worthy tribute to her and a significant contribution to the continuing Saunders legacy. Diverse in content, liberal leaning in its theology, Beyond the Horizon has roots deep in tradition and draws on several cultures,… Continue reading

Invisible lives, invisible deaths: Tanith Muller on the hidden burden of Parkinson’s

Published on: Author: guwebteam 8 Comments
Tanith Muller

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been reflecting on how generous people can be with their time and their experiences, even when times are impossibly tough. I’ve worked for the charity Parkinson’s UK for the last eight years. In that time I have met hundreds of people whose reality is dominated by the emotional and… Continue reading

Progress for the Scottish Parliament Inquiry into Palliative Care

Published on: Author: David Clark 2 Comments
Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh

The public has responded to a call for views on the state of palliative care in Scotland, and with the publication of these submissions the Scottish Parliament Inquiry into Palliative Care is making rapid progress. I am struck by two things: the great variety of these responses, but also the rather low volume.  Perhaps that tells… Continue reading

Why we need a human rights framework for the end of life

Published on: Author: guwebteam Leave a comment
Sharon Youngsmall

A United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Dying and Seriously Ill could improve global standards for all people at the end of life, proposes Sharon Young of Kingston University. End of life care provision varies widely throughout the world. Standards of care available to the dying and seriously ill depend upon the… Continue reading

Is the voluntary refusal of food and fluid an alternative to assisted dying?

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards 7 Comments
Dr Naomi Richards, University of Glasgow

Two of the most influential right-to-die campaigners in the UK, Debbie Purdy and Tony Nicklinson, died after voluntarily refusing food and fluid, as well as refusing antibiotics. This sparked my interest in this method of suicide as a natural extension of my research into debates around assisted suicide (Richards 2012; Richards 2014). It was reported in the press that… Continue reading