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How Can Death be the Great Equalizer in the Face of Inequality?

Published on: Author: Amy Shea Leave a comment

Eight minutes and forty-six seconds. That’s how long an officer kept his knee on George Floyd’s neck resulting in his death from asphyxiation. In eulogizing Floyd, Reverend Al Sharpton said, “Since four hundred and one years ago, the reason we could never be who we wanted and dreamed of being is you kept your knee… Continue reading

The role of online Death Cafes during Covid-19 crisis

Published on: Author: Solveiga Zibaite 2 Comments

Until Death Café meetings moved from cafes, libraries, community centres, cemeteries, etc. to the online sphere due to social distancing measures, it had not occurred to me to specify that my PhD thesis is about face to face Death Café meetings. Online Death Cafés were an exception, not the rule when I conducted my fieldwork… Continue reading

Don’t watch with me

Published on: Author: sgreenhalgh Leave a comment

Reflections of a Hospice CEO on the emerging COVID-19 crisis Toiling up the knoll on brittle ground frost we clambered over a creaking stile to be rewarded by the sun glistening on Windermere set against a backdrop of distant snowclad fells.  Our short walk had brought a welcome opportunity to reflect during our annual board… Continue reading

In these strange times…

Published on: Author: josephwood2 2 Comments

Coronavirus is changing the way we live in a way that is repeatedly said to be unprecedented. We say we are living through strange times, extraordinary times, difficult times. For some of us lucky enough to be able to work from home time might be stretching out in lockdown into an endless series of Thursday… Continue reading

Reflections on the ephemerality of online memorials

Published on: Author: Solveiga Zibaite 1 Comment

Online memorials have been a relatively popular form of memorialisation for the best part of this century. They bear markings of birth and death, just as traditional gravestones, however, they allow for an exceptional amount of interaction within them – the bereaved can send messages to the deceased, upload pictures, music, art, poems, and even… Continue reading

Death Writes: A Symposium on Reading and Writing about Death and Dying

Published on: Author: Naomi Richards Leave a comment

Death is not monolithic. It is better to think about deaths and dyings. So said a participant about what she had learnt from our half day symposium on reading and writing death, in May 2019, held at the St Mungo Museum for Religious Life and Art in Glasgow . Not monolithic indeed. Our plan for… Continue reading

Reading and Writing Death and Dying Symposium

Published on: Author: Amy Shea Leave a comment

In the 2017-2018 academic year, myself, Dr Naomi Richards, and Dr Elizabeth Reeder held a series of reading and writing workshops centered around the topic of death and dying. We each facilitated a couple of workshops. A fellow PhD student, Solveiga Zibaite also facilitated a workshop. They brought together a diverse group of people all… Continue reading

From Health Care to Humanities: A Retirement Project

Published on: Author: Julie Lang Leave a comment

I had spent forty years as a physiotherapist in the NHS and my retirement was looming unplanned when I decided, during my final working year, to apply for the University of Glasgow access course. I discovered that my previous academic qualifications, outwith a four-year limit, didn’t count, and that my MSc, that had researched a… Continue reading